HISTORY MINOR

 

The current cluster of courses for the online History minor is designed primarily to give students a basic knowledge of American and Appalachian Regional history, with the opportunity for more specialized study in upper division courses.

 

Students completing the 15-hour requirement should emerge not only with a firm grasp of the American and Appalachian historical experiences generally, but a more nuanced understanding of the political, social, economic, religious, and cultural factors that have shaped those experiences as well. Students will also acquire skills of critical analysis by examining various historical sources as part of regularly scheduled class assignments and will be introduced to the writing of history. A firm grounding in history has long been considered excellent preparation for graduate and professional (especially law) school, while recent research has revealed that government and the private sector often seeks out individuals who are articulate in history, which is the basic aim of this minor.

 

Students must select 2 courses (6 hours) from the following:

HIST 101. Western Civilization: Antiquity to 1600

3 credit hours
 

A survey of the major developments in Western civilization beginning with the ancient Mediterranean world and concluding with Reformation Europe. This course is typically offered during the spring, summer and fall terms.

HIST 102. Western Civilization: 1600 to Present

3 credit hours
 

A survey of major developments in Western civilization from 1600 to the present with attention to Europe’s emerging industrial society and changing role in world affairs. This course is typically offered during the summer and fall terms.

HIST 152. Growth American Nation to 1865

3 credit hours
 

This course examines the basic political, economic, and social forces in formation and development of the United States before 1865. Emphasis on national development from independence through the Civil War. This course is typically offered during the spring, summer and fall terms.

HIST 153. Making Modern America: 1865-Present

3 credit hours
 

Continues the examination of basic political, economic, and social forces in the development of the United States since the Civil War. This course is typically offered during the spring, summer and fall terms.

HIST 180. World History Since 1500

3 credit hours
 

Comparative history of Africa, Asia, and Europe 1500 to the present. Political, economic, and social developments with emphasis on patterns of authority, the individual, nature, society, and the impact of the West. This course is typically offered during the summer term.

Students must select 3 courses (9 hours) from the following:

HIST 304. History of Sacred Places

3 credit hours
 

Begins by analyzing the meaning of sacred and then proceeds to a comparative historical, religious, and political discussion of selected sacred places. This course is typically offered during the summer term.

HIST 412. Introduction to Public History

3 credit hours
 

Introduction to a wide range of career possibilities for historians in areas such as archives, historical societies, editing projects, museums, business, libraries, and historic preservation. Lectures, guest speakers, field trips, individual projects. This course is typically offered during the spring and fall terms.

HIST 422. Twentieth Century Germany from Weimar to Born

3 credit hours
 

The Weimar Republic, the Third Reich, and the two German states created after World War II. This course is typically offered during the spring term.

HIST 442. 18th Century America

3 credit hours
 

The social, political, and economic maturation of England’s American colonies, the move toward independence, and the establishment of government at state and federal levels. This course is typically offered during the summer term.

HIST 453. Civil War and Reconstruction

3 credit hours
 

Causes as well as constitutional and diplomatic aspects of the Civil War; the role of American black in slavery, in war, and in freedom; and the economic and political aspects of Congressional Reconstruction. This course is typically offered during the spring, summer and fall terms.

HIST 460. World War II in America

3 credit hours
 

Examines the American experience in World War II; with an emphasis on the economic, social, and political impact of war on American society. This course is typically offered during the summer term.

HIST 473. Appalachian Regional History

3 credit hours
 

Historical survey of Central Appalachia's three phases of development: traditional society of the nineteenth century, the transformation of a mountain society by industrialization at the turn of the twentieth century, and contemporary Appalachia. This course is typically offered during the fall term.

HIST 477. Working Class America

3 credit hours
 

This course is designed to introduce students to issues surrounding the American working class. It will explore changes in the modes of production, the impact of labor migrations, the emergence of working-class organizations, and the political and social ideologies of working people. Particular attention will be given to the impact of racial, ethnic and gender-based conflict on the emergence of working-class movements. Students will be encouraged to interpret historical material in the context of current workplace relations. This course is typically offered during the spring term.

 

For additional information contact Kate Staples at Kate.Staples@mail.wvu.edu. To register for online courses, contact WVU Online at (800) 253-2762 or email elearn@mail.wvu.edu.